Latest titles

  • The Khoesan were the first people in Africa to undergo the full rigours of European colonisation. By the early nineteenth century, they had largely been brought under colonial rule, dispossessed of their land and stock, and forced to work as labourers for farmers of European descent. Comprising 98 of these texts, These Oppressions Won’t Cease – an utterance expressed by Willem Uithaalder, comm ...

    More about: These Oppressions Won’t Cease
  • The transition from apartheid to the post-apartheid era has highlighted questions about the past and the persistence of its influence in present-day South Africa. This is particularly so in education, where the past continues to play a decisive role in relation to inequality. Between Worlds: German Missionaries and the Transition from Mission to Bantu Education in South Africa scrutinises the e ...

    More about: Between Worlds
  • This classic text, first published in 1999, is a remarkable man’s personal memoir of a life in South African resistance politics from the late 1930s to the 1960s. In recalling the events in which he participated, and the way in which the apartheid regime affected the lives of those involved in the opposition movements, Rusty Bernstein provides valuable insights into the social and political ...

    More about: Memory Against Forgetting
  • In The State of Secularism Leatt guides the reader from a history of global political secularism through an exploration of the roles played by religion and traditional authority in apartheid South Africa to the position of religion in the post-apartheid state. ...

    More about: The State of Secularism
  • The Mpumalanga Escarpment, stretching from Ohrigstad in the north via Lydenburg and Machadodorp to Carolina in the south, saw massive changes in precolonial times. Still visible today is a vast expanse of man-made stone walling which connects over 10 000 square kilometres of land into a complex web of circular homesteads, towns, terraced fields and linking roads, stretching for 150 kilometres in a ...

    More about: Lefase leo le Lebetswego
  • The Mpumalanga Escarpment, stretching from Ohrigstad in the north via Lydenburg and Machadodorp to Carolina in the south, saw massive changes in precolonial times. Still visible today is a vast expanse of man-made stone walling which connects over 10 000 square kilometres of land into a complex web of circular homesteads, towns, terraced fields and linking roads, stretching for 150 kilometres in a ...

    More about: Vergete Wêreld
  • In Race Otherwise: Forging a New Humanism for South Africa Zimitri Erasmus questions the notion that one can know race with one’s eyes, with racial categories and with genetic ancestry tests. She moves between the intimate probing of racial identities as we experience them individually, and analysis of the global historical forces that have created these identities and woven them into our th ...

    More about: Race Otherwise
  • Labour Beyond Cosatu is the fifth publication in the Taking Democracy Seriously project which started in 1994 and comprises of surveys of the opinions, attitudes and lifestyles of members of trade unions affiliated to the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu). In its analysis of the survey, it shows that Cosatu, fragmented and weakened through fissures in its alliance with the Africa ...

    More about: Labour Beyond Cosatu
  • Shaping markets through competition and economic regulation is at the heart of addressing the development challenges facing countries in southern Africa. The contributors to Competition Law and Economic Regulation: Addressing Market Power in southern Africa critically assess the efficacy of the competition and economic regulation frameworks, including the impact of a number of the regional competi ...

    More about: Competition Law and Economic Regulation
  • In Healing the Exposed Being, Robert Thornton presents a new vocabulary and ontology for understanding fundamental concepts of a regional version of the Ngoma cult, found throughout the Bantu language-speaking areas of Africa. He is thus able to provide a more integrated anthropological account of beliefs and practices that have survived from pre-colonial to postcolonial times, describing them in ...

    More about: Healing the Exposed Being

News

Eminent historian and author, Professor Phil Bonner has passed away

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

It is with great sadness that Wits University Press announces the passing of eminent historian and author of various urban histories and histories of black resistance, Professor Phil Bonner. Phil Bonner (1945-2017), an academic who has been associated with the University of the Witwatersrand for over four decades, leaves a significant body of research and […]

News

Wits University Press publisher, Veronica Klipp writes on the costs of losing local research to global publishers

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

SOUTH AFRICA The costs of losing local research to global publishers Writing in the University World News, Wits University Press publisher, Veronica Klipp says local scholarly publishing faces the challenges of the small local market and that the costs of losing local research to global publishers is high.   South Africa boasts an impressive pedigree of […]

News

Two Wits Press titles included on the Longlist of the Alan Paton 2017 awards!

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

   Wits Press has two titles selected for the Long List of the Alan Paton Award 2017. They are: Apartheid and The Making of a Black Psychologist: A Memoir, N. Chabani Manganyi (Wits University Press) and Learning Zulu: A Secret History of Language in South Africa, Mark Sanders (Wits University Press) Congratulations to Chabani Manganyi […]

  • Read more Wits Press
  • News
  • »

Current and forthcoming