New South African Review 3

The Second Phase – Tragedy or Farce?
Editor(s): , , ,
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Dimensions and Pages: 240 mm x 170 mm, 352 pp
  • EAN: 978 1 86814 735 9
  • Rights: World
  • Recommended Price (ZAR): 100.00
  • Recommended Price (USD): 39.95

The New South African Review offers, for the third time, a valuable compass to navigate us through South(ern) African socio-economic and political realities. It is an important stocktaking exercise. With every year, the New South African Review becomes an ever more important tool for analytical insights into, and assessments of, the challenges.

— Henning Melber, Director Emeritus of the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation in Uppsala, Sweden; Extraordinary Professor in the Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria; and Research Associate with the Centre for Africa Studies, University of the Free State.

Hegel remarks somewhere that all great world-historic facts and personages appear, so to speak, twice. He forgot to add: the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce …
(Karl Marx 1852)

In the face of the continuing national tragedy of the inequality, poverty and unemployment which have triggered rising working-class discontent around the country, the ANC announced a ‘second phase’ of the ‘national democratic revolution’ to deal with the challenges. Ironically, the ANC post-Mangaung has resolved to preserve the core tenets of the minerals-energy-financial complex that defined racial capitalism – while at the same time ratcheting up the revolutionary rhetoric to keep the working class and marginalised onside. If the ‘first phase’ was a tragedy of the unmet expectations of the majority, is the ‘second phase’ likely to be a farce? The chapters in this volume are written by experts in their fields and address issues of politics, power and social class; economy, ecology and labour; public policy and social practice; and South Africa beyond its borders. They examine some of these challenges, and indicate that they are as much about the defective content of policies as their poor implementation. The third volume of the New South African Review continues the series by providing in-depth analyses of the key issues facing our country today.

INTRODUCTION
The second phase – tragedy or farce?
Devan Pillay

PART 1: Party, Power and Class
INTRODUCTION
Party, power and class
John Daniel
CHAPTER 1
The power elite in democratic South Africa: Race and class in a fractured society
Roger Southall
CHAPTER 2
The ANC circa 2012-13: Colossus in decline?
Susan Booysen
CHAPTER 3
Fragile multi-class alliances compared: Some unlikely parallels between the National Party and the African National Congress
Paul Maylam
CHAPTER 4
Predicaments of post-apartheid social movement politics: The Anti-Privatisation Forum in Johannesburg
Ahmed Veriava and Prishani Naidoo

PART 2: Ecology, Economy and Labour
INTRODUCTION
Ecology, economy and labour
Devan Pillay
CHAPTER 5
Mass unemployment and the low-wage regime in South Africa
Dick Forslund
CHAPTER 6
Nationalisation and the mines
Martin Nicol
CHAPTER 7
Broad-based BEE? HCI’s empowerment model and the syndicalist tradition
William Atwell
CHAPTER 8
‘Ask for a camel when you expect to get a goat’: Contentious politics and the climate justice movement
Jacklyn Cock
CHAPTER 9
Hydraulic fracturing in South Africa: Correcting the democratic deficits
David Fig

PART THREE: Public Policy and Social Pract ice
INTRODUCTION
Public policy and social practice
Prishani Naidoo
CHAPTER 10
Understanding the persistence of low levels of skills in South Africa
Stephanie Allais
CHAPTER 11
Equity, quality and access in South African education: A work still very muchin progress
Shireen Motala
CHAPTER 12
Health sector reforms and policy implementation in South Africa: A paradox?
Laetitia Rispel and Julia Moorman
CHAPTER 13
Cadre deployment versus merit? Reviewing politicisation in the public service
Vinothan Naidoo
CHAPTER 14
Traditional male initiation: Culture and the Constitution
Louise Vincent

PART 4: South Africa at Large
INTRODUCTION
South Africa at large
Roger Southall
CHAPTER 15
South Africa and the BRIC: Punching above its weight?
Sanusha Naidu
CHAPTER 16
The Swazi Nation, the Swazi government and the South African connection
John Daniel and Marisha Ramdeen

List of Contributors

John Daniel is the retired Academic Director of the School for International Training in Durban. Prishani Naidoo, Devan Pillay and Roger Southall are all in the Department of Sociology at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

The New South African Review offers, for the third time, a valuable compass to navigate us through South(ern) African socio-economic and political realities. It is an important stocktaking exercise. With every year, the New South African Review becomes an ever more important tool for analytical insights into, and assessments of, the challenges.

— Henning Melber, Director Emeritus of the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation in Uppsala, Sweden; Extraordinary Professor in the Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria; and Research Associate with the Centre for Africa Studies, University of the Free State.

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One Response to “New South African Review 3”

  1. […] in the public service’. In Daniel, J., PIllay, D., Naidoo, P. and Southall, R. (eds.). New South African Review 3: The second phase – tragedy or farce? Johannesburg: Wits University […]

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