Power and Loss in South African Journalism

News in the age of social media
Author(s):
  • Publication Date: July 2020
  • Dimensions and Pages: 229 x 152; 232pp
  • Paperback EAN: 9781776145997
  • eBook EAN: 9781776146017
  • PDF EAN: 9781776146000
  • Rights: World
  • Recommended Price (ZAR): 350.00
  • Recommended Price (USD): 20

What is the power of journalism in an era of social media? Power and Loss in South African
Journalism examines this important question and makes a ringing call to re-imagine the
media for the 21st century.
—Ferial Haffajee, associate editor, Daily Maverick

Glenda Daniels takes sophisticated theoretical turns to recuperate the idea that the media
ought not to reinforce existing patterns of power and domination, but instead, question the
social order to mediate the emergence of a just and equal society. A must-read for scholars,
students, policy makers and journalists trying to understand complex disruptive changes in
the media.
—Tawana Kupe, vice-chancellor and principal, University of Pretoria

This timely book analyses the crisis and chaos of journalism in contemporary South Africa at a period when the media and their role are frequently at the centre of public debate. The transition to digital news has been messy, random and unpredictable.
The spread of news via social media platforms has given rise to political propaganda, fake news and a flattening of news to banality and gossip. Media companies, however, continue to shrink newsrooms, ousting experienced journalists in favour of ‘content producers’.
Against this backdrop, Daniels points out the contribution of investigative journalists to exposing corruption and sees new opportunities emerging to forge a model for the future of non-profit, public-funded journalism. Engaging and dynamic, the book argues for the power of public interest journalism, including investigative journalism, and a diversity of voices and positions to be reflected in the news. It addresses the gains and losses from decolonial and feminist perspectives and advocates for a radical shift in the way power is constituted by the media in the South African postcolony.
A valuable introduction to the confusion that confronts journalism students, it has much to offer practising media professionals. Daniels uses her years of experience as a newspaper journalist to write with authority and illuminate complex issues about newsroom politics. Interviews with alienated media professionals and a semiautobiographical lens add a personal element that will appeal to readers interested in the inner life of the media.

Tables and figures
Preface
Acknowledgements
Acronyms
Glossary
1. Power and subjection in the media landscape
2. The tension between the media, the state and Zuma’s African National Congress
3. ‘Zupta’: Power and loss in investigative journalism
4. The job loss tsunami in journalism
5. Going online when you’re offline: The case of community media
6. The anti-feminist backlash, the glass ceiling and online trolls
7. Decolonial ‘green shoots’ in media
8. Power, loss and reimagining journalism
Epilogue
Appendices
References
Index

Glenda Daniels is an associate professor in the Department of Media Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. She is a media-freedom activist and journalist and author of Fight for Democracy (2014).

What is the power of journalism in an era of social media? Power and Loss in South African
Journalism examines this important question and makes a ringing call to re-imagine the
media for the 21st century.
—Ferial Haffajee, associate editor, Daily Maverick

Glenda Daniels takes sophisticated theoretical turns to recuperate the idea that the media
ought not to reinforce existing patterns of power and domination, but instead, question the
social order to mediate the emergence of a just and equal society. A must-read for scholars,
students, policy makers and journalists trying to understand complex disruptive changes in
the media.
—Tawana Kupe, vice-chancellor and principal, University of Pretoria

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