Society, Health and Disease in South Africa

Author(s): , , , , , ,
  • Publication Date: February 2019
  • Dimensions and Pages: 297 x 210mm; 368pp; includes graphs, tables and B&W illustrations
  • Paperback EAN: 9781776143146
  • Rights: South Africa
  • Recommended Price (ZAR): R520.00

This reader is a vital contribution to students and practitioners’ appreciation of the social basis of health, illness and disease. It has a wide reach, appealing to students across the spectrum of health and social sciences, as well as serving as a resource for educators.

Kathleen Kahn, Professor and Senior Scientist, MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand

This reader, written by a team of sociologists with long-standing teaching and research experience in the social aspects of health and health care, is an essential accompaniment to all undergraduate and postgraduate health programmes in South Africa.

Helen Schneider, Professor, School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape

The onset of the quadruple burden of disease in South Africa, the challenges faced by the medical establishment to curtail the rapid growth of multiple epidemics, the inadequate response by the state to various inequities in the health system, and the public debates associated with it, have all combined to draw attention to the sociological aspects of health and disease. Sociology as a resource of knowledge and a unique analytical and conceptual perspective can be used to understand, explain and positively influence the course of health and disease in South African society and our responses to it.

As a health practitioner or scholar you must be equipped with the skills to critically evaluate research and debates in your profession, be able to adapt to changes and contribute to the development of knowledge and best practice. This reader will familiarise you with relevant content and assist you to develop the analytical capacity and conceptual skills you will need.

Society, Health and Disease in South Africa is authored by experienced educators and researchers in the fields of sociology, social work, anthropology, healthcare policy and practice.

This reader: 
– Exposes Health Science students and practitioners to a sociological perspective of health, illness and disease;
– Introduces Social Science students to health, illness and disease as a focus of sociological inquiry; and
– Offers educators an updated resource with both theoretical and empirical content in Health Sociology.

In addition:
– A wealth of new and updated resources;
– Critical perspectives on how social context and environment are related to health and disease; particularly in a time of chronic illness and the quadruple burden of disease in South Africa; and
– Opportunities for interactive learning – highlighting key issues and current debates and asking for questions that encourage critical thinking and engagement with the readings and real life situations.

Overview
User’s guide

SECTION 1: HEALTH IN THE SOCIAL CONTEXT
Introduction
Social Behavioural Sciences: Training Health
Professionals
Introduction to Sociology
Definitions of Health
Medical Power
Conclusion
References
Readings
Tasks and questions

SECTION 2: CULTURE AND HEALTH
Introduction
What is Culture?
Cultural Aspects of Health
Health Care and Medical Pluralism
Conclusion
References
Readings
Tasks and questions

SECTION 3: HEALTH IN SOUTH AFRICA
Introduction
Social Inequality and Health
Situational Analysis of Health in South Africa
Equity in Health Services
Conclusion
References
Readings
Tasks and questions

SECTION 4: HEALTH IN PRACTICE
Introduction
The PSE model as a core ‘building block’ of the
BPS model in contemporary health science
The Embodiment Framework (EF) as a key
mechanism of healthcare practice
Re-centring health within holistic healthcare
Sociology and Health Science Professions
in South Africa
Patients and Health Care Practitioners in
Contemporary Practice
Conclusion
References
Additional recommended readings
Readings
Tasks and questions

Leah Gilbert is Emeritus Professor of Health Sociology in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Liz Walker is Professor of Health and Social Work in the School of Health and Social Work, University of Hull, United Kingdom as well as visiting research associate in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Silvie Cooper is Teaching Fellow in the Department of Applied Health Research, University College London, United Kingdom, as well as visiting research associate in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Kezia Lewins is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Rajohane Matshedisho is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Lorena Nunez-Carrasco is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Terry-Ann Selikow has a PhD in Sociology and a Higher Diploma for Educators of Adults. She focuses on Health Sociology, Social Theory and Research Methodology. Her pedagogical approach is aimed at encouraging students to think independently and critically.

This reader is a vital contribution to students and practitioners’ appreciation of the social basis of health, illness and disease. It has a wide reach, appealing to students across the spectrum of health and social sciences, as well as serving as a resource for educators.

Kathleen Kahn, Professor and Senior Scientist, MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand

This reader, written by a team of sociologists with long-standing teaching and research experience in the social aspects of health and health care, is an essential accompaniment to all undergraduate and postgraduate health programmes in South Africa.

Helen Schneider, Professor, School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape

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