Urban Revolt

State Power and the Rise of People’s Movements in the Global South
Editor(s): , ,
  • Publication Date: May 2017
  • Dimensions and Pages: 229 x 152mm; 218 pp
  • Paperback EAN: 978-1-77614-170-8
  • eBook EAN: 987-1-77614-176-0
  • PDF EAN: 987-1-77614-176-0
  • Rights: Southern Africa
  • Recommended Price (ZAR): 350.00

“A superb addition to the literature on the contemporary global crisis and its micro manifestations.”
Patrick Bond, BRICS: An Anticapitalist Critique

“What emerges from this collection is a complex picture of resistance, which nevertheless provides nuanced hope for a universalist project of social transformation…. The result is often a refreshing and accessible journey into urban revolts that the reader may have less familiarity with.”
Leo Zeilig, Struggles Today: Social Movements Since Independence

The urban poor and working class now make up the majority of the world’s population, which is expected to expand to 10 billion by midcentury. Much of the growth results from the displacement of rural peasants to the urban cores, resulting in the vast expansion of megacities with populations of up to 20 million people in the global South. The proliferation of informal settlements and slums has resulted in urban areas becoming the principal sites of social upheaval as people seek to improve their living conditions. Drawing on case studies from Africa, Latin America, and Asia, the various chapters in this book map and analyze the conditions in which the majority of the world exists and struggles in the contemporary urban context.

Advancing beyond a liberal perspective, the book unpacks the ways in which Urban Social Movements in the global South have challenged or transformed how the city is organized and created possibilities for a revolutionary alternative to the capitalist hegemonic framework.

Introduction – Trevor Ngwane, Luke Sinwell and Immanuel Ness

PART 1: AFRICAN MOVEMENTS OF THE URBAN POOR
Chapter 1: Thembelihle Burning, Hope Rising by Luke Sinwell
Chapter 2: Against all odds: The “Spirit of Marikana” and the Resurgence of the Working Class Movement in South Africa
by Trevor Ngwane
Chapter 3: Makoko Slum Settlement: Migrant Peasants on the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria by Ayokunle Olumuyiwa Omobowale
with Adefemi Abdulmojeed Adeyanju

PART II: PROTEST AND STRUGGLE IN LATIN AMERICA
Chapter 4: The Ayotzinapa Massacre: Mexico’s Popular Protests and New Landscapes of Indignation by Claudia Delgado Villegas
Chapter 5: The Case of the West Zone: Urban Revolt and Social Movement Adaptations in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil by Simone
da Silva Ribeiro Gomes
Chapter 6: The Uruguayan Recyclers’ Union: Clasifi cadores, Circulation and the Challenge of Mobile Labour Organization
by Patrick O’Hare

PART III: URBAN SQUATTER MOVEMENTS IN SOUTH ASIA: KOLKATA AND JAKARTA
Chapter 7: Nonadanga Eviction in Kolkata: Contemporary Urban Development and People’s Resistance by Swapna
Banerjee-Guha
Chapter 8: The Struggle of the Urban Poor against Forced Eviction in Jakarta by Muhammad Ridha
Contributor Biographies
References
Notes
Index

Trevor Ngwane is a scholar and activist. He is currently reading for a PhD at the University of Johannesburg
where he is attached to the Research Chair for Social Change in which he is a researcher in the Rebellion of the
Poor protest monitoring and database compilation project.

Luke Sinwell is a Senior Researcher with the South African Research Chair in Social Change, University of
Johannesburg. He is a co-author of The Spirit of Marikana: The rise of insurgent trade unionism in South
Africa (Wits University Press:2016), and the co-editor of Contesting Transformation: Popular Resistance
in Twenty-First Century South Africa (Pluto Press 2012).

Immanuel Ness, PhD, is professor of political science at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. Ness
is author of amongst others, Southern Insurgency: The Coming of the Global Working Class (Pluto, 2015).

“A superb addition to the literature on the contemporary global crisis and its micro manifestations.”
Patrick Bond, BRICS: An Anticapitalist Critique

“What emerges from this collection is a complex picture of resistance, which nevertheless provides nuanced hope for a universalist project of social transformation…. The result is often a refreshing and accessible journey into urban revolts that the reader may have less familiarity with.”
Leo Zeilig, Struggles Today: Social Movements Since Independence

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